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Andrews AFB Store Information

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The 2016 Holiday Hours and Closure Schedule for JB Andrews Commissary:

Columbus Day October 10, 2016 (0900-1700 hours)
Veteran's Day November 11, 2016 (0900-1700 hours)
Thanksgiving Day November 24, 2016 (CLOSED)
Christmas Eve December 24, 2016 (0900-1600 hours)
Christmas Day December 25, 2016 (CLOSED)
New Year Eve December 31, 2016 (0900-2100 hours)
New Year's Day January 1, 2017 (CLOSED)

Andrews Commissary offers the following;

***Early Bird Shopping Hours are 0800-0900 (Mon-Fri )
***19 regular cash registers, 6 self checkout registers, 4 SCO's for 15 items or fewer and 2 carousel style SCO's for 25 items or fewer.
***Fruit and Veggie Trays available in the Produce Dept.; small Trays serves approx 6-8 individuals and large trays serves approx 20-25 individuals
*** A variety of club pack items for your convenience, purchase larger sizes and save.
***Deli/Bakery Dept which sells Rotisserie Chicken and Turkey Beast,chicken wings.

***Guard and Reserve Members Now enjoy Unlimited Commissary Privileges!
Accept credit/debit cards
No tax, 5% surcharge used to build or renovate commissaries
Coupon, WIC, And Food Stamp
If you live far away, load up on non-perishables after drill--open Friday and Saturday until 2100 and Sunday until 1900.

Guest are welcome however can not purchase.

For more information about ID Card Scanning, access our FAQS under Customer Service tab at www.commissaries.com


Your Commissary ...
Its Worth the Trip

Maximize your Commissary

Maximize your Commissary Benefit by Visiting the Website
A growing number of commissary patrons are using www.commissaries.com to help them maximize their savings before they shop. Here are a couple of website highlights accessible from the menu bar at the top of the www.commissaries.com homepage: 1) Locations tab  Patrons can plan shopping trips before they leave home by checking store hours, sale dates and special events on their stores individual Web pages. Shoppers can also obtain local store news, telephone numbers, email addresses and directions to their commissary; 2) Shopping tab  Sales and Events page features the commissary sales flyer. Authorized shoppers can log in to see the biweekly sales flyer with discounted products; every two weeks it reflects products as they go on and off sale. The flyer also contains the Thinking Outside the Box venue that matches healthy recipes with products on sale. The Shopping tab also contains information about Commissary Rewards Cards, Value Brands, Commissary Gift Cards, and schedules for case lot sales and other major DeCA events.

DeCA protects your food
DeCA works to safeguard your food. When you purchase products from the commissary you can be assured that they have passed through a multi-tiered inspection process designed to safeguard and protect the food you bring home to your family. DeCA works with the military services to ensure the safety and security of your groceries. See the Food safety, security and sanitation brochure at
https://www.commissaries.com/documents/FSSS_Brochure_revised_12-21-2005.pdf.


Commissary Gift Cards offer Unique Value for Patrons.
By Mike Perron,DeCA Public Affairs Specialist
FORT LEE, Va.  Gift cards are a great idea. They solve the problem of trying to figure out what to give someone with a simple answer: give them a choice. But then youre faced with a different question  which card to give? Sure, you could give them one for an online retailer, but then much of the cards value would probably go toward paying shipping costs and handling fees.
What to do?
Heres an idea: get them a commissary gift card! Authorized shoppers can then pick out what they want, knowing theyre getting the biggest bang for every dollar spent by shopping at the commissary and taking advantage of the best prices in town. And from meat and potatoes to hanging plants, commissaries sell a surprising variety of everyday needs.
The cards can be used to purchase anything sold in the commissary, said Bob Bunch, the Defense Commissary Agencys gift card program manager. And we do about $5 million a year in gift card sales. The program, which enters its 6th year in June, has seen just shy of 660-thousand cards worth more than $22.5 million snapped up by givers. And unlike most gift cards, shoppers actually use the commissary gift cards they receive. Our redemption rate is really phenomenal, said Bunch, adding that almost 90 percent of all cards sold have been fully redeemed. The industry average redemption rate for a gift card is about 75 percent.
The cards are available to anyone online at commissaries.com and in-store for authorized commissary shoppers.
Here are some commissary gift card quick facts:
" Gift cards are available at all commissaries worldwide  on a rack at full service, front-end registers  as well as the website. Just use the Place your order button on the Gift Cards page.
" Cards are good for five years from the date of purchase.
" Only gift cards purchased online incur a shipping and handling fee. There are no fees when the card is purchased in a store.
" There is no limit to the number of gifts cards that a purchaser can buy. However, DeCA officials recommend organizations and activities consider purchasing their cards online if they plan to purchase more than 50 at a time.
" The cards can be sent anywhere in the United States. However, cards can only be shipped to APO, FPO or DPO addresses outside the United States.
" To check card balances, use the Check Your Balance button on the Gift Cards page.
Customers who still have unused gift vouchers, the precursor to the gift card, may still redeem them through Aug. 31, regardless of the expiration date printed on it. After that date, DeCA will no longer accept the vouchers as a form of payment.
For customer service questions, please call 877-988-4438, which is also found on the back of the gift card. Customers can also use this number to check the balance on their card.
-DeCA-

Are You Prepared for Disaster?
Commissary patrons can save on their emergency supplies
By Kevin L. Robinson, DeCA Public Affairs Specialist
FORT LEE, Va.  Although military commissaries arent equipped to predict the next emergency, they do encourage their patrons to use their benefit to be prepared.
The Defense Commissary Agency routinely offers savings compared to commercial stores on the necessary items for any emergency, said agency Sales Director Tracie Russ.
It would be nice if we could accurately predict the impact of the next storm when it came to power outages, interruptions in available water and store closures. However, we do know from past experience its better to plan for the unexpected, Russ said. Thats why we work with our industry partners to offer deep discounts on many of the food products and other items our patrons need to be prepared.
As they take stock in their state of readiness, military patrons can shop their local commissaries for the following items, considered appropriate for disaster preparedness: beef jerky and other assorted meat snacks, soup and chili mixes, canned goods, powdered milk, cereals, batteries, airtight bags, weather-ready flashlights, tape (all-weather, heavy-duty shipping and duct), first-aid kits, lighters, matches, lanterns, candles, hand sanitizer and anti-bacterial wipes. Specific items may vary from store to store.
According to a May 13 forecast from the Weather Channel (https://weather.com/storms/hurricane/news/2016-hurricane-season-forecast-atlantic-the-weather-channel), the 2016 hurricane season is expected to have 14 named storms, eight of which will be hurricanes with three of the hurricanes potentially being category 3 or higher.
The North Atlantic hurricane season runs June 1 to Nov. 30 and covers the North Atlantic Ocean, the Caribbean Sea and the Gulf of Mexico. Tornado season runs from April to July.
Emergency preparedness officials suggest having a disaster supply kit that includes the following items:
" Water  at least one gallon daily, per person (three-day supply for evacuation, two-week supply for home)
" Nonperishable foods  canned meats, fruits, vegetables, dried fruits, nuts, raisins, cereal, crackers, cookies, energy bars, granola, peanut butter, and foods for infants and the elderly (three-day supply for evacuation, two-week supply for home)
" Paper goods  writing paper, paper plates, paper towels and toilet paper
" Cooking items  pots, pans, baking sheets, cooking utensils, charcoal, a grill and a manual can opener
" First-aid kit  including bandages, medicines and prescription medications
" Cleaning materials  bleach, sanitizing spray, and hand and laundry soap
" Specialty foods  diet and low-calorie foods and drinks
" Toiletries  personal hygiene items and moisture wipes
" Pet care items  food, water, muzzle, leash, carrier, medications, medical records, and identification and immunization tags
" Lighting accessories  flashlight, batteries, candles and matches
" Battery-powered or hand-crank radio (NOAA Weather Radio, if possible)
" Duct tape, scissors
" Multipurpose tool
" Copies of personal documents (medication list and pertinent medical information, proof of address, deed/lease to home, passports, birth certificates and insurance policies)
" Cell phone with chargers
" Family and emergency contact information
" Extra cash
" Emergency blanket
" Maps of the area
" Blankets or sleeping bags
For more information about disaster preparedness, go to https://www.commissaries.com/disaster_prep.cfm for lists of resources.
-DeCA-

Home Safety Helps

Home safety helps prevent foodborne illnesses
By Kevin L. Robinson,
DeCA public affairs specialist
FORT LEE, Va.  When it comes to food safety, a few simple precautions at home could prevent a trip to the emergency room, Defense Commissary Agency officials say.
Commissary patrons have just as important a role to play in protecting themselves from foodborne illnesses as our food safety inspectors, said Chris Wicker, a public health advisor at DeCA headquarters. Simple actions can go far at home, whether its keeping your hands and food preparation surfaces clean or not leaving food out unrefrigerated after the meal is over.
In observance of Food Safety Month, DeCA is reminding its patrons to use the Be Food Safe guidelines when they handle their groceries from the store to their kitchen table.
The consequences of ignoring food safety at home can be potentially fatal. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 100,000 people are hospitalized and 3,000 die of foodborne illnesses each year.
You cannot take a day off when it comes to food safety, Wicker said. We formally track proper food handling techniques from the farm to the supplier and on to the store. But once they leave the store, consumers must be vigilant, too.
The Be Food Safe message is simple: clean, separate, cook and chill. The Centers for Disease Control and the U.S. Department of Agriculture-Food Safety Inspection Service recommend the following safe handling techniques:

Clean
" Wash hands with warm soapy water for 20 seconds before and after handling raw meat, poultry or seafood.
" Wash utensils, cutting boards, dishes and countertops with hot soapy water after preparing each food item and before you go on to prepare the next item.
" Food contact surfaces can be sanitized with a freshly made solution of 1 tablespoon of unscented, liquid chlorine bleach in 1 gallon of water.
Separate
" Separate raw meat, poultry and seafood from other foods in your grocery shopping cart and in your refrigerator.
" If possible, use one cutting board for fresh produce and a separate one for raw meat, poultry and seafood.
" Never place cooked food on a plate that previously held raw meat, poultry or seafood.
Cook
" Cook poultry to a safe minimum internal temperature of 165 F as measured with a food thermometer.
Chill
" Chill food promptly and properly. Refrigerate or freeze perishables, prepared foods and leftovers within two hours (or one hour if temperatures are above 90 F).

Wicker said cross contamination along with failure to maintain proper temperatures of foods are leading causes of food borne illness  even on the trip home from the commissary.
Its always important to keep different perishable foods separate and that means paying attention to where they are in the car, he said. It also means bringing along a cooler if youre transporting groceries that could spoil during a long trip.
A few more tips for handling food safely can be found at www.homefoodsafety.org:
" Use hand sanitizer to wipe hands and the handle of the shopping cart.
" Clean hands before sampling food. Either bring moist towelettes or carry a bottle of hand sanitizer to use before you taste.
" If you use reusable grocery bags, wash them often.
" Check food packages for holes, tears or openings. Frozen foods should be solid with no signs of thawing.
" Check for a loose lid on jars whose seals seem tampered with or damaged. Report a defective cap to the store manager.
" Avoid buying cans that are deeply dented, bulging, rusting or have a dent on either the top or side seam.
" Use plastic bags to separate raw meat, poultry and seafood before placing them in your cart to avoid contaminating ready-to-eat foods like bread or produce.
" When shopping, select perishable foods last before checkout and group them together.
" Take groceries home immediately and store them right away. If on an extended trip, bring a cooler with chill packs for perishable foods. Perishable foods must be refrigerated within two hours and only one hour if it is over 90 F outside.
" Keep perishable foods out of the hot trunk in summer and place in the air-conditioned car instead.
For more food safety information, visit http://www.commissaries.com and choose News & Info then Food Safety from the dropdown menu. You can also choose Links then Health/Food Safety to see a list of websites on the latest health and safety reports and information from other agencies.
To find the latest food safety alerts and product recalls affecting military commissaries, visit http://www.commissaries.com and click on the Food & Product Recalls box on the front page.
For more food handling techniques, go to http://www.homefoodsafety.org/food-poisoning/food-safety-start-at-the-store.
-DeCA-

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Commissaries.com: The official online resource of the Defense Commissary Agency (DeCA) | 1300 E Ave., Fort Lee, VA 23801–1800